The GULS Law Review

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Are we naively restrained? : A critique on former US Solicitor General, Robert Bork’s view that vertical restraints are always in the best interest of consumers

February 21, 2017

In this article, Mashal Aamir (4th year LL.B), critically discusses the pro and anti-competitive effects of vertical restraints and the extent to which EU Competition law is in line with, or diverges from, Bork’s statement that vertical restraints should be lawful in the consumer interest
 

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In Scotland, no inference may be drawn at trial from the fact that a suspect refused to answer questions put to him or her by the police. Should this rule be changed?

February 20, 2017

In this essay, Nicole Hannah (4th year LL.B ) discusses the recent Lord Carloway review, and whether the right to silence ought to be qualified to allow adverse inferences to be drawn from a suspect's silence during police questioning. 

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“In Scotland, no adverse inference may be drawn at trial from the fact that a suspect refused to answer questions put to him or her by the police. Should this rule be changed?”

February 20, 2017

In this article, Ikra Bhatti (4th year LLB) discusses the rationales for the privilege against self-incrimination and argues that it may be worthwhile to reform the current position and allow adverse inferences to be drawn from a suspects refusal to answer questions put to them.

 

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In Memory of the UK’s Membership of the European Union: 1973 - ?

February 17, 2017

In light of the UK’s vote to leave the European Union, this article by Saif Gilani (2nd year LLB) analyses the timeframe needed for the UK to withdraw from the EU, considering the key legal and political obstacles which must first be overcome.

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Family Feudalism

February 17, 2017

In this article, Paul Sanders (4th year LLB ) examines the legal issue in McNaughton's Executor v Major and places its outcome in the wider context of the Scottish Parliament's abolition of feudal land tenure.

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Self-Driving Cars: the legal ‘whodunit’

February 17, 2017

In this article, 4th Year LLB student and Obligations Law sub-editor Sarah Hassall,  addresses whether or not the present law is suitable for the incorporation of autonomous vehicles. It looks to the developing law in the USA concerning issues of liability and considers how these issues would be handled in Scotland.

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In Scotland, no inference may be drawn at trial from the fact that suspect refused to answer questions put to him or her by the police. Should this rule be changed?

February 17, 2017

In this article, 4th year LLB student and Commercial Law sub-editor Sarah Drummond discusses the right to silence in Scotland and whether or not we should draw adverse inferences from the exercise of this right. 

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A critical discussion of the pro and anti-competitive effects of vertical restraints and the extent to which EU Competition Law is in line with, or diverges from, Bork’s statement.

February 16, 2017

This article, written by Laura Rankin (4th Year LLB ), criticises Robert Bork’s view of vertical agreements and why, in light of the modernisation process of the Euorpean Commission, undertakings are still reluctant to incorporate such agreements. It is clear that the current law diverges significantly from the view of Bork owed particularly to the ambiguity of what is to be considered the primary aim of EU Competition Law.

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Are Two Really Better Than One? A Critical Evaluation of the Law of Human Reproductive Cloning

February 16, 2017

In this article, Rachael Jane Ruth (Diploma in Professional Legal Practice), critically evaluates the strict governance surrounding Human Reproductive Cloning through analysis of its potential benefits and risks.

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Labour as a fictitious commodity: The insight of Polanyi and the double movement in the development of the European Union

February 16, 2017

In this article, Yazdon Taghinia (4th year LLB) examines the concept of labour as a fictitious commodity as argued by the works of Karl Polanyi in the context of the development of the EU.

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